Afterimage receives Artforum Critic’s Pick

October 15, 2012

Afterimage opened on September 14th to record crowds and has since garnered great praise, most notably, a Critic’s Pick from ArtForum, which can be read here and found online as well. Additional press links are below.

Rebecca Shore, 09, 2010, oil on canvas, 30 x 45”.

It is a testament to the generative richness of the Chicago Imagists, who coalesced around the Art Institute of Chicago and the Hyde Park Art Center in the 1960s, that a show about their influence on artists working today is so void of anxiety and full of exuberance. In a small separate gallery at the museum’s entrance, a concise sample of fourteen Imagist prints, drawings, and paintings by James Nutt,Christina Ramberg, and Ed Paschke, among others from the 1960s and ’70s, reminds viewers of the original movement’s loosely associated idiosyncrasies: figural forms, often with a combination of hieratic graphic precision and grotesque distortion, comic juxtaposition and cryptic text, recurrence of motifs and the suggestion of hidden or symbolic meaning, and strong colors not of the Pop art Day-Glo variety but out of comic books, Surrealist painting, and homespun craft.

The title “Afterimage” refers to the persistence of an image on the retina after an initial exposure, and it’s true that some specific Imagist precedents crack across the mind’s eye when one moves through the twenty-five recent works on display. For instance, David Leggett’s squirming black ink lines, which trace incongruities such as a chain of daisies and a floating brain in Summer of Dreams and Magic, 2010, recall James Falconer’s squirrely ink drawings (see Slep Portrait, 1966, on view in the entrance gallery). For others, the persistence of Imagism is not so retinal. In Rebecca Shore’s oil painting 09, 2010, it’s found in the potential of some connective symbolic logic behind the farrago of neat silhouettes that she lays across a teal ground—a wig, a pot, a leg, a lock. One paired relation promises to unlock a story or game, but the whole remains an insoluble spread of surface variation. Because Imagism is both underrecognized outside of Chicago and inherently difficult to define in its recourse to personal meaning and individual style, “Afterimage”’s influence shoots in both directions as a later generation of artists reads and rearticulates Imagism’s import. – Julia Langbein

Artslant Review, by Alicia Chester

Best Bet for Fall, from the Chicago Reader

Fall Preview, from the Chicago Tribune

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upcoming Events

Halfway to California: A Conversation about Midwest Aesthetics

7/11/2018

Wednesday, July 11, 5 pm

On the occasion of “BEVERLY FRESH: Really Somethin Else,” an exhibition of work by Zack Ostrowski that explores ritual and performance in small towns across the rural Midwest, we will convene curators and artists who examine subjects of the Midwest that raise issues around gender, religion, class, and taste among others. What does it mean to make work in a region that is positioned by its name as halfway to somewhere else? Can we reframe the cultural production of so-called flyover states as worthy of examination on its own terms? The panel will foster a discussion about notions of the center and periphery looking at artists such as Mike Kelly, Jim Shaw, BEVERLY FRESH, and others while refuting the idea that the Midwest and rural areas are devoid of culture.

Panelists include: BEVERLY FRESH, artist; Steven Bridges, Associate Curator, Broad Museum at MSU; Lisa Stone, curator, Roger Brown Study Collection; Jonas Becker, artist; Rob Sevier, Co-founder, Numero Group

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