Ink, Paper, Politics: This Fall at DPAM

August 28, 2014

August 28, 2014
WPA-era printmaking exhibit to open Sept. 11 at DePaul Art Museum

CHICAGO — Images of city life, labor and the workplace, and protests against social injustice will be among the fine-art prints in an exhibition opening Sept. 11 at the DePaul Art Museum.

The 56 prints in the exhibition were produced during the Depression, when the federal government was providing financial support to a wide range of artistic projects, from fiction to fine art, through the Works Progress Administration-Federal Arts Project (WPA-FAP).

“The prints are a window into the 1930s, a turbulent and complex time in American history,” said curator Louise Lincoln, director of the museum on DePaul University’s Lincoln Park Campus. “It’s easy to see the hardships in the lives of ordinary people, the social and political controversies, even the disagreements among artists about what the role of art should be,” she said.

Many works addressed the nation’s economic inequality, leading some politicians to denounce the WPA as subversive, according to Lincoln. A congressional committee investigated the program as a Communist threat, and a 1938 story in the Chicago Tribune called it “a vampire political machine,” she said.

But many artists and critics believed that the WPA had helped to develop something distinctly American in American art, and artists were deeply grateful for the opportunity to earn their livelihood, Lincoln said. Franklin D. Roosevelt predicted that “one hundred years from now my administration will be known for its art, not for its relief programs.”

The exhibition includes works by such well-known artists as Stuart Davis and Rockwell Kent, and is drawn from a donation of 100 prints to the museum from the collection of Belverd Needles Jr. and Marian Powers Needles. Belverd Needles is the EY Distinguished Professor of Accountancy at the Driehaus College of Business at DePaul University; Marian Needles is an adjunct professor of executive education at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

“This wonderfully generous gift carves out a new area in the museum’s collection, and will provide a rich source of exploration and enjoyment for our students and visitors,” Lincoln said.

As part of the Sept. 11 opening, a lecture on how prints were viewed by audiences in the 1930s will be presented by Helen Langa, an associate professor of art history at American University in Washington, D.C. The lecture begins at 5:30 p.m. and a public reception will follow.

On Oct. 15, a lecture on the controversies over political content in the prints will be presented by Liz Seaton, curator at Kansas State University’s Beach Museum of Art. The lecture begins at 5:30 p.m. All events are free and open to the public.

The exhibition — Ink, Paper, Politics: WPA-era Printmaking from the Needles Collection — runs through Dec 21.

The DePaul Art Museum at 935 W. Fullerton, just east of the CTA Fullerton ‘L’ stop, is open Wednesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. The museum is closed Mondays and Tuesdays. For more information, call 773-325-7506 or visit www.depaul.edu/museum.

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Source:
Louise Lincoln
LLINCOLN@depaul.edu

Media Contacts:

Jon Cecero
jcecero@depaul.edu
(312) 362-7640

Carol Hughes
chughe23@depaul.edu
312-362-8592

Summer at DPAM Starts July 10

July 3, 2014

DePaul Art Museum opens new exhibitions July 10


Using modified IKEA products, the Linear Accelerator by Jeff Carter was built using an electric motor and light fixtures. The sculpture exhibition is one of two shows coming to the DePaul Art Museum July 10. (Image courtesy of Jeff Carter
DePaul Art Museum will feature a selection of works from the museum’s permanent collection, as well as sculptures in the form of architectural models based roughly on former Chicago structures in two exhibitions opening July 10.

 

“Fires Will Burn”: Politically Engaged Art from the Permanent Collection — July 10 – Dec. 21

Drawing on DePaul’s own collection, this exhibition surveys a wide range of political expression, touching on racial prejudice, immigration issues and opposition to war. It includes Diego Rivera’s painting of the Mexican Revolution; John Wilson’s searing “Down by the Riverside,” a suite of etchings about slavery; and Gerda Meyer Bernstein’s powerful installation of “The Justice Chair.” Also included in this exhibition is a seldom-seen portfolio of prints by Chicago artists protesting the Vietnam War. Although the works vary widely in subject, scale and medium, the artists share the conviction that visual images can help to bring about social change.

“We are always excited when we can create an exhibition out of our own collection; in this case we have acquired some great things recently, through gift and purchase,” said Louise Lincoln, director of the DePaul Art Museum.

“The Common Citizenship of Forms”: New Sculpture by Jeff Carter — July 10 – Aug. 31

Using ready-to-assemble components from the global home-furnishings store Ikea, Jeff Carter repurposes them into architectural models that are simultaneously familiar and a bit different. Carter is an associate professor in the department of Art Media and Design at DePaul’s College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences. His constructions replicate buildings from the now-demolished Michael Reese Hospital campus on the South Side of Chicago, exploring the formal vocabulary of Bauhaus architecture while also considering the dilemma of modern material culture: Can mass-produced consumer goods be “good” design? Which is more socially useful: inexpensive products to buy or artisanal production and jobs?

“It is a great group of objects related to Chicago’s architectural history while simultaneously commenting on the current issue of consumerism,” said Lincoln, who brought Carter’s sculpture to the museum because it addresses important societal questions.

“Guests will be surprised and intrigued, not only to see familiar objects used in a creative way, but also for the way the pieces suggest their history and purpose. It’s a pleasure to show faculty work and these pieces are smart, accessible and have a point to make,” she said.

The DePaul Art Museum at 935 W. Fullerton, just east of the CTA’s Fullerton ‘L’ stop, is open this summer on Wednesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. It will be closed Monday and Tuesday. For more information, call 773-325-7506 or visit http://museums.depaul.edu.

Source: www.depaul.edu

 

From Heart to Hand: Closing June 22

March 24, 2014
CHICAGO — The DePaul Art Museum will unveil a new exhibition, “From Heart to Hand,” on April 10 featuring 23 quilts produced by African-American women. Originally organized by the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts in Alabama, the exhibition demonstrates that quilts are not just household goods, but are also a means of personal expression.“The exhibition makes a very strong argument that not all art comes in a gold frame and that some things that are made for a practical use can also be transcendently beautiful and filled with meaning,” said Louise Lincoln, director of the museum at DePaul University’s Lincoln Park Campus.While quilting has been around in various forms for centuries, Lincoln explains that it was approximately 15 years ago that the contemporary art world “discovered” the distinctive work of the women in the town of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, who created quilts with intricate patterns that resembled abstract paintings. As the Gee’s Bend artists have become famous, quilt exhibitions have grown in popularity and have been featured in major museums, including the Whitney Museum in New York.The collection on display at DePaul Art Museum will include examples from Gee’s Bend, as well as other styles and subjects from the region of western Alabama, giving viewers rich insight on tradition and community.Lincoln, who is also the curator for the exhibition, chose “From Heart to Hand” because of “the wonderful opportunity to broaden our visitors’ perspective, to understand the history of art made by women, and to extend the idea of what ‘art’ is.”“By identifying the artists by name and showing the remarkable variations and innovations they produce, the exhibition gives quilts and their makers the respect they deserve,” she said.

A series of programs will accompany the exhibition. Carolyn Ducey, curator of collections at the International Quilt Studies Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, will give an introduction to the history of quilting in the South on April 12 at 2 p.m. Celebrated quilter and one of the featured exhibition artists, Yvonne Wells, will give a lecture on April 26 at 1 p.m. Both events are free and open to the public. For more information on these events, visit http://bit.ly/PUx4cp.

The exhibition will be featured at the DePaul Art Museum from April 10 – June 22.

The DePaul Art Museum at 935 W. Fullerton, just east of the CTA’s Fullerton ‘L’ stop, is open Wednesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. The museum is closed Mondays and Tuesdays. For more information, call 773-325-7506 or visit www.depaul.edu/museum.

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Media Contact:
Wendy Zamaripa
wzamarip@depaul.edu
312-362-7749

Opening January 2014: The Sochi Project

December 10, 2013

December 18, 2013
Sochi Project shows turbulent side of Olympic host region
Photo exhibit makes US debut at DePaul Art Museum in Chicago

Click here for an “Art Minute” video interview with Rob and Arnold
 

CHICAGO — The Russian city of Sochi, host to the 2014 Winter Olympics, is the focus of a new photography exhibition that debuts in the U.S. Jan. 9 at the DePaul Art Museum. “The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus,” by photographer Rob Hornstra and writer Arnold van Bruggen, also will travel to Canada and New York and be on view in Europe. The exhibition portrays Sochi at a combustible crossroads of war, tourism and history.

“These beautiful, evocative photos show the Sochi we won’t see on TV: the faded Soviet resort city with turbulent politics and a tough economy. We come away with a deeper and more complex view of the glitz and glamour of the games,” said Louise Lincoln, director of the museum at DePaul University’s Lincoln Park Campus.Hornstra and van Bruggen have been documenting the rapidly changing area around Sochi since 2009, exploring the small-yet-complicated region just before the glare of international media attention arrives. “Never before have the Olympic Games been held in a region that contrasts more strongly with the glamour of the event than Sochi,” wrote van Bruggen.A Soviet‐era resort town on the Black Sea, Sochi is in the heart of an impoverished region embroiled in ethnic and nationalistic conflict. It is still a tourist destination, which the project creators call “the Florida of Russia,” with vacationers flocking to the sanatoria for spa treatments and relaxation. “On the coast, old Soviet–era sanatoria stand shoulder to shoulder with the most expensive hotels and clubs of the Russian Riviera. By 2014 the area around Sochi will have been changed beyond recognition,” wrote van Bruggen.

Hornstra and van Bruggen present a study in contrasts. The region supports entertainment and tourism but also struggles with poverty, corruption, displacement and terrorism. “The Sochi Project” combines documentary storytelling and contemporary photography by utilizing a variety of formats: photographs, videos, text, and self-published books.

“‘The Sochi Project’ reveals the unseen side of a highly visible global event. These photos stand in stark relief with the typically glossy press images of the Olympics,” said Gregory J. Harris, assistant curator at the DePaul Art Museum. He is curator for the Chicago edition of the exhibition.

“The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus” is co-organized by the DePaul Art Museum and Aperture Foundation, New York. Aperture also has published a 512-page book to accompany the exhibition.

The exhibition will be at the DePaul Art Museum Jan. 9 to March 24. A reception and book signing with Hornstra and van Bruggen will be held Jan. 17 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

A workshop with photographer Rob Hornstra will be held at the DePaul Art Museum on Jan. 18 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. “Becoming an Independent Photographer: DIY Storytelling, Self-publishing, and Project Funding” is co-organized with Filter Photo Festival. The cost is $75; register at http://sochiproject.eventbrite.com.

Following its showing in Chicago, “The Sochi Project” will travel to the CONTACT Photo Festival in Toronto, FotoFocus in Cincinnati and the Aperture Gallery in New York. Concurrent with the exhibition in Chicago, “The Sochi Project” also will be on view in Antwerp, Belgium and Salzburg, Austria. For more information, visit http://www.thesochiproject.org/en.

The DePaul Art Museum at 935 W. Fullerton, just east of the CTA’s Fullerton ‘L’ stop, is open Wednesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. It is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. For more information, call 773-325-7506 or visit http://www.depaul.edu/museum.

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SOURCES:
Gregory J. Harris
gharris7@depaul.edu

Louise Lincoln
llincoln@depaul.edu

Media Contact:
Kristin Claes Mathews
kmathew5@depaul.edu
312-241-9856

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Opening September 12, We Shall: Photographs by Paul D’Amato

September 9, 2013

Opening September 12,  We Shall: Photographs by Paul D’Amato

CHICAGO — The DePaul Art Museum probes complex issues of portraiture and representation across lines of race and community with We Shall, a new exhibition of works by Chicago photographer Paul D’Amato. The exhibition opens Thursday, September 12.

The exhibition chronicles dramas large and small in the lives of ordinary people through a group of portraits and studies of the urban landscape made on the west side of Chicago. “D’Amato is best known for his subtle and revelatory portraits, made collaboratively with his subjects,” said Gregory Harris, Assistant Curator at the DePaul Art Museum. “His photos refuse to provide all of the answers but instead embrace an aesthetic and poignant complexity that allows us to experience things we may not fully understand.”

An opening reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. September 12 at the museum, located at 935 W. Fullerton Ave., just east of the CTA’s Fullerton ‘L’ stop. The museum is free and open to the public every day. The exhibition runs through November 24. There will be a VIP preview from 5 – 6 the same evening, as well as a book release for the exhibition’s companion publication. DPAM will also be releasing the first Collector Print for members of the new “Friends of DPAM” member group.

“D’Amato’s images reveal unanticipated layers of meaning, supported by a deep sense of place and the photographer’s empathetic eye,” said Louise Lincoln, DPAM Director, “After looking at these images, it is practically impossible not to see people and surroundings through a different lens and understand broad issues of race, class, and inequality in more embodied ways.”

We Shall is the first museum exhibition of D’Amato’s latest series.

Accompanying programs at the museum explore some of the ideas and issues behind the photographs:

● “The Portrait: 2-Day Photography Workshop with Paul D’Amato.” Saturday, October 5 and Sunday, October 6. More information can be found here: http://museums.depaul.edu/events/workshop

● “Economics, Public Policy, Politics, and the City Many of Us Rarely See.” Talk with DePaul author and political scientist Larry Bennett. Wednesday, October 9, 6 p.m.

● Gallery talk and guided tour with curator Gregory Harris and artist Paul D’Amato. Saturday, November 2, 1 p.m.

● “What is the Image We’re Looking For? Depictions of Race and Class in American Journalism and Photojournalism.”  Talk with author and New York University professor Susie Linfield.  Thursday, November 14, 6 p.m.

A full list of programs and events related to the exhibition is online at http://museums.depaul.edu/news/calendar/. All programs (except workshop) are free of charge.

The DePaul Art Museum is about to enter its third year in its new home. The museum is open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, call 773-325-7506 or visit www.depaul.edu/museum

 

Upcoming Events

Liminal Camera @ Northwestern Law School **NOTE CHANGE**

11/2/2014

A mobile camera made out of a shipping container, the Liminal Camera is one of the most ambitious art projects underway today. Traversing the country by land and by water—from the back of a flatbed truck and via barge—it has explored vast regions of the American West and the Hudson and Erie canals. On the occasion of the Festival, the Liminal Camera journeys to Chicago to probe the state of the American dream. The result, monumentally scaled black-and-white prints, will go on view at the DePaul Art Museum in May 2015.

Climb inside the Liminal Camera! Watch the artists at work as they develop new prints from their time in Chicago.

Northwestern Law School – Thorne Auditorium
375 E Chicago Ave
Chicago, IL
November 2, 12 p.m. – 2 p.m.

This project is presented in collaboration with the Chicago Humanities Festival. 

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Ursa Ensemble: Collaboration in Concert

11/8/2014

Saturday, Nov 8th, 2014. 2 p.m.

Collaboration In Concert with Miranda Thomas

Ursa Ensemble presents the next installment of its innovative Collaboration In Concert with guest visual artist, Miranda Thomas. An experienced teacher, Miranda will give the audience a quick-and-dirty introduction to her style of art. The audience will then be challenged to create their own work using Miranda’s techniques, inspired by the music of Ursa Ensemble. After the performance, the audience is invited to stay for a small reception and discuss the music and their creations with each other, Miranda, and the members of Ursa Ensemble. For more information, please visit ursaensemble.com.

Free and open to the public.

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DPAM Closed for Installation

12/22/2015

DPAM will be closed for installation between December 22, 2014 and January 28, 2015. We will re-open on January 29, 2015 with “Rooted in Soil.”

Read More >