From Heart to Hand: Opening April 10

March 24, 2014
CHICAGO — The DePaul Art Museum will unveil a new exhibition, “From Heart to Hand,” on April 10 featuring 23 quilts produced by African-American women. Originally organized by the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts in Alabama, the exhibition demonstrates that quilts are not just household goods, but are also a means of personal expression.“The exhibition makes a very strong argument that not all art comes in a gold frame and that some things that are made for a practical use can also be transcendently beautiful and filled with meaning,” said Louise Lincoln, director of the museum at DePaul University’s Lincoln Park Campus.While quilting has been around in various forms for centuries, Lincoln explains that it was approximately 15 years ago that the contemporary art world “discovered” the distinctive work of the women in the town of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, who created quilts with intricate patterns that resembled abstract paintings. As the Gee’s Bend artists have become famous, quilt exhibitions have grown in popularity and have been featured in major museums, including the Whitney Museum in New York.The collection on display at DePaul Art Museum will include examples from Gee’s Bend, as well as other styles and subjects from the region of western Alabama, giving viewers rich insight on tradition and community.Lincoln, who is also the curator for the exhibition, chose “From Heart to Hand” because of “the wonderful opportunity to broaden our visitors’ perspective, to understand the history of art made by women, and to extend the idea of what ‘art’ is.”

“By identifying the artists by name and showing the remarkable variations and innovations they produce, the exhibition gives quilts and their makers the respect they deserve,” she said.

A series of programs will accompany the exhibition. Carolyn Ducey, curator of collections at the International Quilt Studies Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, will give an introduction to the history of quilting in the South on April 12 at 2 p.m. Celebrated quilter and one of the featured exhibition artists, Yvonne Wells, will give a lecture on April 26 at 1 p.m. Both events are free and open to the public. For more information on these events, visit http://bit.ly/PUx4cp.

The exhibition will be featured at the DePaul Art Museum from April 10 – June 22.

The DePaul Art Museum at 935 W. Fullerton, just east of the CTA’s Fullerton ‘L’ stop, is open Wednesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. The museum is closed Mondays and Tuesdays. For more information, call 773-325-7506 or visit www.depaul.edu/museum.

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Media Contact:
Wendy Zamaripa
wzamarip@depaul.edu
312-362-7749

Opening January 2014: The Sochi Project

December 10, 2013

December 18, 2013
Sochi Project shows turbulent side of Olympic host region
Photo exhibit makes US debut at DePaul Art Museum in Chicago

Click here for an “Art Minute” video interview with Rob and Arnold
 

CHICAGO — The Russian city of Sochi, host to the 2014 Winter Olympics, is the focus of a new photography exhibition that debuts in the U.S. Jan. 9 at the DePaul Art Museum. “The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus,” by photographer Rob Hornstra and writer Arnold van Bruggen, also will travel to Canada and New York and be on view in Europe. The exhibition portrays Sochi at a combustible crossroads of war, tourism and history.

“These beautiful, evocative photos show the Sochi we won’t see on TV: the faded Soviet resort city with turbulent politics and a tough economy. We come away with a deeper and more complex view of the glitz and glamour of the games,” said Louise Lincoln, director of the museum at DePaul University’s Lincoln Park Campus.Hornstra and van Bruggen have been documenting the rapidly changing area around Sochi since 2009, exploring the small-yet-complicated region just before the glare of international media attention arrives. “Never before have the Olympic Games been held in a region that contrasts more strongly with the glamour of the event than Sochi,” wrote van Bruggen.A Soviet‐era resort town on the Black Sea, Sochi is in the heart of an impoverished region embroiled in ethnic and nationalistic conflict. It is still a tourist destination, which the project creators call “the Florida of Russia,” with vacationers flocking to the sanatoria for spa treatments and relaxation. “On the coast, old Soviet–era sanatoria stand shoulder to shoulder with the most expensive hotels and clubs of the Russian Riviera. By 2014 the area around Sochi will have been changed beyond recognition,” wrote van Bruggen.

Hornstra and van Bruggen present a study in contrasts. The region supports entertainment and tourism but also struggles with poverty, corruption, displacement and terrorism. “The Sochi Project” combines documentary storytelling and contemporary photography by utilizing a variety of formats: photographs, videos, text, and self-published books.

“‘The Sochi Project’ reveals the unseen side of a highly visible global event. These photos stand in stark relief with the typically glossy press images of the Olympics,” said Gregory J. Harris, assistant curator at the DePaul Art Museum. He is curator for the Chicago edition of the exhibition.

“The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus” is co-organized by the DePaul Art Museum and Aperture Foundation, New York. Aperture also has published a 512-page book to accompany the exhibition.

The exhibition will be at the DePaul Art Museum Jan. 9 to March 24. A reception and book signing with Hornstra and van Bruggen will be held Jan. 17 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

A workshop with photographer Rob Hornstra will be held at the DePaul Art Museum on Jan. 18 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. “Becoming an Independent Photographer: DIY Storytelling, Self-publishing, and Project Funding” is co-organized with Filter Photo Festival. The cost is $75; register at http://sochiproject.eventbrite.com.

Following its showing in Chicago, “The Sochi Project” will travel to the CONTACT Photo Festival in Toronto, FotoFocus in Cincinnati and the Aperture Gallery in New York. Concurrent with the exhibition in Chicago, “The Sochi Project” also will be on view in Antwerp, Belgium and Salzburg, Austria. For more information, visit http://www.thesochiproject.org/en.

The DePaul Art Museum at 935 W. Fullerton, just east of the CTA’s Fullerton ‘L’ stop, is open Wednesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. It is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. For more information, call 773-325-7506 or visit http://www.depaul.edu/museum.

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SOURCES:
Gregory J. Harris
gharris7@depaul.edu

Louise Lincoln
llincoln@depaul.edu

Media Contact:
Kristin Claes Mathews
kmathew5@depaul.edu
312-241-9856

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Opening September 12, We Shall: Photographs by Paul D’Amato

September 9, 2013

Opening September 12,  We Shall: Photographs by Paul D’Amato

CHICAGO — The DePaul Art Museum probes complex issues of portraiture and representation across lines of race and community with We Shall, a new exhibition of works by Chicago photographer Paul D’Amato. The exhibition opens Thursday, September 12.

The exhibition chronicles dramas large and small in the lives of ordinary people through a group of portraits and studies of the urban landscape made on the west side of Chicago. “D’Amato is best known for his subtle and revelatory portraits, made collaboratively with his subjects,” said Gregory Harris, Assistant Curator at the DePaul Art Museum. “His photos refuse to provide all of the answers but instead embrace an aesthetic and poignant complexity that allows us to experience things we may not fully understand.”

An opening reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. September 12 at the museum, located at 935 W. Fullerton Ave., just east of the CTA’s Fullerton ‘L’ stop. The museum is free and open to the public every day. The exhibition runs through November 24. There will be a VIP preview from 5 – 6 the same evening, as well as a book release for the exhibition’s companion publication. DPAM will also be releasing the first Collector Print for members of the new “Friends of DPAM” member group.

“D’Amato’s images reveal unanticipated layers of meaning, supported by a deep sense of place and the photographer’s empathetic eye,” said Louise Lincoln, DPAM Director, “After looking at these images, it is practically impossible not to see people and surroundings through a different lens and understand broad issues of race, class, and inequality in more embodied ways.”

We Shall is the first museum exhibition of D’Amato’s latest series.

Accompanying programs at the museum explore some of the ideas and issues behind the photographs:

● “The Portrait: 2-Day Photography Workshop with Paul D’Amato.” Saturday, October 5 and Sunday, October 6. More information can be found here: http://museums.depaul.edu/events/workshop

● “Economics, Public Policy, Politics, and the City Many of Us Rarely See.” Talk with DePaul author and political scientist Larry Bennett. Wednesday, October 9, 6 p.m.

● Gallery talk and guided tour with curator Gregory Harris and artist Paul D’Amato. Saturday, November 2, 1 p.m.

● “What is the Image We’re Looking For? Depictions of Race and Class in American Journalism and Photojournalism.”  Talk with author and New York University professor Susie Linfield.  Thursday, November 14, 6 p.m.

A full list of programs and events related to the exhibition is online at http://museums.depaul.edu/news/calendar/. All programs (except workshop) are free of charge.

The DePaul Art Museum is about to enter its third year in its new home. The museum is open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, call 773-325-7506 or visit www.depaul.edu/museum

 

“Summer shows at DPAM are Chicago-centric”

July 1, 2013

CHICAGO — Chicago artists are front and center in three shows at the DePaul Art Museum this summer. The first exhibition, which opens July 1, features artworks given to DePaul University from the Koffler Collection. Selected pieces by Dominick Di Meo, an artist whose paintings were profoundly influenced by his time in Chicago in the 1960s, will be on display beginning July 11. And, an exhibition of works by DePaul faculty will go on display July 25 in the museum on DePaul University’s Lincoln Park Campus.

Gifts from the Koffler Collection
July 1 – Sept. 1

Samuel and Blanche Koffler became interested in local Chicago artists after moving from New York to Chicago in the 1950s. They started a foundation to buy works from Chicago artists and amassed a notable collection over the span of 40 years. Their support helped artists earn a living, and made a persuasive argument for the appreciation of regional art. In 2012, a generous gift of 95 paintings, prints and sculptures from the Koffler Collection was added to DePaul’s permanent collection.

“They were really eclectic in their taste and they didn’t just support one kind of artist. They believed in artists as a group, as a profession,” said Louise Lincoln, director of the DePaul Art Museum.

 

Dominick Di Meo: Visionary Garden
July 11 – Sept. 1

Dominick Di Meo was a member of the “Monster Roster” — Chicago artists who in the mid-20th century developed a distinct approach to the human figure that incorporated a dark sense of humor. An important figure in the 1960s Chicago art circle, Di Meo moved to New York in 1968 after spending  time in Italy.

“Some of his images suggest the influence of his Italian experience, a sense  that he’s walking on the  past , an accumulation of people, things and history,” Lincoln said.

 

DePaul Faculty Exhibition
July 25 – Sept. 29

From painting and photography to found-object sculpture and multimedia performance, these works by DePaul faculty demonstrate the strength and diversity of their professional practice and the breadth of their teaching.

Among the DePaul faculty artists are: Shiro Akiyoshi, Gagik Aroutiunian, Lisa Barcy, Marita Bolles, Jeff Carter, Tom Denlinger, Marcy Dinius, Nomi Epstein, Susan Giles, Steve Harp, Anna Henson, Randall Honold, Laura Kina, Jeff Kowalkowski, Zack Ostrowski, Bob Palmieri, Mary Ann Papanek-Miller, Keiler Roberts, Adam Schreiber, H. Peter Steves, Bibiana Suarez, Selina Trepp, Dolores Wilber, Chi Jang Yin and Mark Zlotkowski.

A reception including a live multimedia performance and an evening of film screenings is planned for September.

The DePaul Art Museum opened in its new $7.8 million three-story home in September 2011. The museum is open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, call 773-325-7506 or visit http://museums.depaul.edu.

 

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Media Contact:
Maria Toscano
mtoscan2@depaul.edu
(312) 362-7740

- See more at: http://newsroom.depaul.edu/NewsReleases/showNews.aspx?NID=2668#sthash.dpKaTS9S.dpuf

Opening 4/25: “War Baby / Love Child: Mixed Race Asian American Art”

April 16, 2013

CHICAGO — The DePaul Art Museum explores the construction of mixed-heritage Asian American identity in the United States with “War Baby/Love Child: Mixed Race Asian American Art,” which opens April 25.

“It gives visibility to the increasingly mixed generation coming of age by highlighting artworks that map personal biography and the construction of mixed heritage Asian American identity against U.S. and transnational histories,” said Laura Kina, exhibit curator. Kina is a Vincent de Paul Professor and founding member of Global Asian Studies at DePaul University, where she also is an associate professor of art, media and design in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences.

An opening reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. April 25 at the museum, located at 935 W. Fullerton Ave., just east of the CTA’s Fullerton ‘L’ stop. The museum is free and open to the public every day. The exhibition runs through June 30.

“Through traditional media as well as video, installation and other approaches, artists explore a range of topics, including U.S. wars in Asia, multiculturalism and identity politics, racialization, gender and sexual identity, citizenship and nationality, and transracial adoption,” said Kina. She co-edited a book of the same title with Wei Ming Dariotis, an associate professor of Asian American studies at San Francisco State University.

Artists featured in the exhibition include Mequitta Ahuja, Albert Chong, Serene Ford, Kip Fulbeck, Stuart Gaffney, Louie Gong, Jane Jin Kaisen, Lori Kay, Li-Lan, Richard Lou, Samia Mirza, Chris Naka, Laurel Nakadate, Gina Osterloh, Adrienne Pao, Cristina Lei Rodriguez, Amanda Ross-Ho, Jenifer Wofford and Debra Yepa-Pappan.

In conjunction with the exhibition, a number of programs will be held at the museum to encourage a dialogue on the topics. Programs include:

● “The Woman, The Orphan, and the Tiger,” April 29, 6 to 8 p.m. Film screening and discussion with Danish filmmaker Jane Jin Kaisen on international transracial Korean adoption.

● Mequitta Ahuja Artist Talk, May 15, 6 to 8 p.m. Ahuja, who is known for her large-scale figurative paintings and drawings, refers to her work and method as “automythography,” a constructive process of identity formation in which nature, culture and self-invention merge.

● Mixed race Asian American art and identity panel discussion, May 29, 6 to 8 p.m. Curator Laura Kina, author Camilla Fojas and artists Chris Naka and Debra Yepa-Pappan.

A full list of programs and events related to the exhibition is online athttp://museums.depaul.edu/news/calendar/.

For more information about this traveling exhibition and the related publication, visithttp://www.warbabylovechild.com.

This is the DePaul Art Museum’s second year in its new home. The museum is open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, call 773-325-7506 or visithttp://museums.depaul.edu.

Upcoming Events

CHIPWG Reading Group and Discussion with Shawn Michelle Smith

4/22/2014

CHIPWG Reading Group and Discussion with Shawn Michelle Smith

Tuesday April 22, 2014
5:30-7:00 pm

DePaul Art Museum
935 West Fullerton Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614

R.S.V.P. at artmuseum@depaul.edu

Join the Chicago Photography Working Group and the DePaul Art Museum for a conversation and discussion with Shawn Michelle Smith about her book, At the Edge of Sight (Duke University Press, 2013).

At the Edge of Sight points a literary lens at not only what is evident in photographic images but also that which is off to the periphery, noticeable but mostly ignored. Through a re-reading of Roalnd Barthes and historic images from the work of early American photographers, including F. Holland Day, Eadweard Muybridge, and Chansonetta Stanley Emmons, Smith formulates new interpretations, connecting the significance of those personal and visual histories to our own. Photography’s reflection of other technological advances and its illustrative capacity for sexual and power politics are contrasted against a perpetual cultural blindness to the full breadth of what the medium presents, and doesn’t.

Shawn Michelle Smith’s work focuses on the cultural histories of photography with an emphasis on issue of race and gender. Smith is the author of Visual Culture and American Archives: Gender, Race, and Class in Visual Culture (Princeton University Press, 1999) and Photography on the Color Line: W. E. B. Du Bois, Race (Duke University Press, 2004). She is coauthor of Lynching Photographs (University of California Press, 2008) and coeditor of Pictures and Progress: Early Photography and the Making of African American Identity (Duke University Press, 2012). Smith is currently Associate Professor of Visual and Critical Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Artist Talk: Yvonne Wells

4/26/2014

Artist Talk with Yvonne Wells

Saturday, April 26, 1 p.m

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DPAM is thrilled to welcome celebrated quilter Yvonne Wells all the way from Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The exhibition features seven of her distinctive works, and she will talk about how her quilts develop from an idea to an image. This talk will be followed by a light reception, and is free and open to the public. 

 

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