Next Generation Leadership Circle

January 10, 2017

Now that I have settled into my first year as director of DePaul Art Museum, I have a sense of our fundamental purpose:

Through the art of our time, DPAM provides a platform to connect people and advance knowledge in a global society.

But this is just the beginning. Crain’s Chicago Business recently asked if I can make DPAM a “major player” and with your help, the answer is YES!

I invite you to join us as a founding member of DPAM’s Next Generation Leadership Circle. With an annual donation of $500 or more:

  • You will help shape the story of how DePaul Art Museum becomes a meaningful cultural hub within the city of Chicago.
  • You will support equity and inclusive opportunities for students, artists, interns and audiences.
  • You will keep art accessible with free admission and free programs for everyone.
  • You will have access to special events and opportunities throughout the year with DPAM staff and artists.

 

First and foremost, I invite you to help me build a program that provides a platform for under-recognized artistic voices. As you can see in our upcoming exhibitions, we are implementing this right away by featuring a wide range of artists from Chicago and beyond.

At this time, more than ever, it is critical that we make visible the wide spectrum of human experience through unique forms of expression. It is urgent that we create a space that promotes visual literacy, critical thinking and the ability to engage with difference in a productive and civil manner, while recognizing artistic excellence.

Next, we are committed to positioning Chicago as a global city in dialogue with internationally recognized artists by weaving Chicago-based artists from all stages of their career into our exhibitions and programs.

We recognize and value how art occupies a sacred space where language often fails and through our programs, we explore how art is connected to all facets of life. As a center for teaching and learning, the museum is a portal to the University’s academic strengths, and for our students, a portal to a global perspective that addresses the complicated and contradictory nature of human experience, past and present.

I invite you to join me as a founding supporter of our new annual giving program, the Next Generation Leadership Circle. With your help and forward-thinking vision, we can build a community that recognizes how art reaffirms our humanity and fosters critical conversations.

Your gift will enable us to organize programs that support the Next Generation of

  • lifelong learning opportunities through the visual arts
  • scholars and scholarship
  • equitable opportunities for artists
  • museum professionals who reflect our communities
  • culturally curious critical thinkers
  • innovators and thought leaders
  • collectors
  • philanthropists

 

To join the Next Generation Leadership Circle, please click here and select “Art Museum Exhibit Fund” for your donation. Your 100% tax-deductible donation of any size will make an immediate and significant impact.

Thank you

Julie Rodrigues Widholm

Director and Chief Curator

Julie Rodrigues Widholm interviewed in Crain’s Chicago Business

November 10, 2016
Can-a-new-director-make-DePaul-Art-Museum-a-major-player.jpg

Photo by Lizabeth Applewhite

Can a new director make DePaul Art Museum a major player?

by Lisa Bertagnoli, published in Crain’s Chicago Business Sept. 17, 2016. 

Can Julie Rodrigues Widholm make DePaul Art Museum a major player in the art world in this town?

Widholm, new director and chief curator at DePaul, is off to a good start. In May, she snagged 114 works by 59 Chicago-area artists from collector Chuck Thurow. On Sept. 24, the museum will claim the Northern Trust Purchase Prize, a gift of art exhibited at Expo Chicago. Widholm and Dia Weil, a university trustee, will select the piece from Expo Chicago’s Exposures gallery, a forum for emerging artists.

The gifts are helping Widholm make DePaul a showcase for artists based in Chicago and those from underrepresented regions and demographics. That niche, she says, will help the museum gain must-see status.

“There is such a deep and talented pool of artists in Chicago,” says Widholm, 41, who joined the museum in August 2015 after 16 years as a curator at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art. There she assembled some 50 shows, including the 2015 retrospective for Doris Salcedo, the first for the Colombian sculptor. “Our institutions can never provide enough opportunities to work with them, showcase them, give them opportunities to grow as artists.”

To increase the focus on Chicago art, as well as on female artists and others from underrepresented spheres, Widholm has hired Mia Lopez as an assistant curator and Laura-Caroline Johnson as collection and exhibition manager.

An emphasis on local work “is an incredibly important gap in terms of the art collections of the city, someone really looking at Chicago art in-depth,” Thurow told Crain’s in August, when news of his gift was made public. “That’s not the MCA’s or Art Institute’s mission.” Thurow declined to disclose the appraised value of the donation.

Overall, Widholm plans to build a collection that spans from the modern era to emerging artists and include international art as well. “It’s important to integrate Chicago artists into several histories that run parallel with each other,” she says.

Widholm has the art to make that happen. Now she needs the money. “Funding is a top priority,” she says.

The museum gets about $500,000 a year from the university, which has an annual budget of about $500 million. A small endowment gives Widholm $25,000 a year to acquire new work. Grants help, too: $15,000 from Alphawood Foundation will underwrite “One Day This Kid Will Get Larger,” a show opening Jan. 26 in which emerging contemporary artists of color explore issues concerning AIDS. DePaul Art Museum stages four to six exhibits a year, each for three months.

 - DePaul Art Museum

DePaul Art Museum

A few million dollars extra would enable Widholm to hire a full-time education and outreach director, and boost marketing and advertising as well.

The museum opened in 1987 in a single room in McGaw Hall on DePaul’s Lincoln Park campus, then moved to the university’s library in 1992. It is now housed in a three-story, 15,000-square-foot space on campus and draws about 12,000 visitors a year. An outreach director could plan programming to draw more people, especially locals, to the museum, says Widholm, who has a master’s in art history, theory and criticism from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

“We are very much a place to build a community—programming is a key way to make people feel welcome,” she says. “Studies have shown that art museums are a social experience. People go to hang out.”

Widholm will launch a private-donor initiative, the museum’s first, in the next few months. She is also building an advisory board and an alumni board, and plans a director’s circle of major funders.

To date, Belverd Needles and his wife, Marian Powers, have supported the museum mostly with gifts of art. “I don’t see why we couldn’t be successful in raising money,” says Needles, EY distinguished professor of accountancy at DePaul, who has been involved with the museum since the mid-1990s. “It’s not the MCA or the Art Institute, but we have a beautiful building, a highly motivated staff, university support and successful graduates,” he says.

Widholm’s MCA background will help her court the donors she needs to catapult DePaul Art Museum into elite territory. “When you’re a curator for a major institution like the MCA, you build up community credit,” says Tony Karman, president and director of Expo Chicago, which opens Sept. 22 at Navy Pier. Widholm has a reputation as “an able, smart, effective curator, a wonderful person to work with,” he says. “That’s why doors are opening.”

DePaul hired Widholm to “take (the museum) to the next level,” says the Rev. Ed Udovic, vice president for teaching and learning resources at the university. Widholm replaced Louise Lincoln, who retired after 17 years.

Lincoln “professionalized the operation,” cataloging works and organizing what was once chaos, Udovic says. She also oversaw the new building, which opened in 2011 and cost $7.8 million. University capital funds covered the cost.

All in all, that’s a good foundation for Widholm to build on. “I have this vision that people think of us as part of their daily life,” she says. “If you’re walking home, you just pop in.”

DPAM is now on ARTSY

November 2, 2016

ARTSY is an online hub for contemporary art lovers. Follow your favorite artists, galleries and art museums- and now DPAM too! Check it out.

 

Chicago Museum Week

October 11, 2016

Recent Gift to DePaul Art Museum

August 22, 2016

CHICAGO — Collectors and artists in Chicago who are seeking to build a legacy of the city’s modern and emerging artists are finding a home for artwork in the DePaul Art Museum’s collection. Located on DePaul University’s Lincoln Park Campus, the museum recently acquired more than 100 works by Chicago-based artists, underlining its commitment to curate, exhibit and collect art from the local community.

Collector Chuck Thurow donated the 114 works by 59 Chicago artists to the DePaul Art Museum’s permanent collection, strengthening the museum’s hometown focus that positions Chicago as a global city. The works include paintings, photography, sculpture, drawings and other works on paper.

“This gift supports the DePaul Art Museum’s vision to reflect the history of art in Chicago, from the modern era to the present,” said Julie Rodrigues Widholm, director and chief curator of the museum. “Whether artists have spent their whole career here, studied here or were born here, we are interested in all of those scenarios in which Chicago is a touch point for artists.”

“It is significant that this gift is from Chuck Thurow, who rallied support for artists in Chicago as director of the Hyde Park Arts Center and has played a significant role in the story of art in Chicago that we’re trying to tell,” Widholm added.

Many of the artists were not previously represented in the DePaul Art Museum’s collection, and the donation significantly expands the museum’s holdings of local art. Works include:

 

  • Paintings by Jim Lutes, Phyllis Bramson, Candida Alvarez and Philip Hanson.
  • Photography by Dawoud Bey, Bob Thall, Jay Boersma, Ben Gest, Shane Huffman, Lisa Lindvay and Jeremiah Hulsebos-Spofford.
  • Works on paper by Linda Kramer, Oli Watt, Richard Rezac, Mike Lash, Paul LaMantia, Eleanor Speiss-Ferris, Max King Cap, Karl Wirsum and Sandra Perlow.
  • Works from Latino artists including Juan Angel Chavez, Nicolas de Jesus, Arnaldo Roche, Michael Hernandez de Luna, Paul Sierra and Santiago Filemon.
  • Early work from Theaster Gates, Brian Calvin and Marie Krane Bergman.
  • Small sculptures by Chris Garofalo, Faheem Majeed, and Marva Jolly.
  • Works by self-taught artists: Mr. Imagination, Derek Webster and Stephen Warde Anderson.

 

Thurow collected the artwork during his tenure as director of the Hyde Park Art Center on Chicago’s South Side, from 1998 to 2010. Throughout his career, Thurow said he worked to “make Chicago a great place for artists to live and work.”

“Part of that is not only the exhibition spaces, but places that are building a legacy of art in the city, and DePaul is one of those places. I was very delighted to give the work to their collection,” Thurow said.

DePaul’s faculty and students will have access to study these works at the museum. According to Thurow, he was drawn to that scholarship and the museum’s connection to Chicago.

“It’s a chance to tackle the question: What is the relationship between the physical place and the creativity in that place? And that’s an exciting topic to me, to have the collection in an academic setting where people are looking at those kinds of questions. That’s one of the reasons I love having given the material to DePaul,” said Thurow.

Earlier this year, the DePaul Art Museum lent several works by Chicago artists to the Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago for its “Monster Roster” exhibition. Thurow noticed that the holdings from DePaul rounded out the show. “You would not be able to do a show in-depth like that without the DePaul Art Museum.”

Chicago artists are also featured in this summer’s exhibitions at the DePaul Art Museum. Tony Fitzpatrick’s “The Secret Birds” and Barbara Rossi’s “Poor Traits” and “Eye Owe You!” are on display through Aug. 21.

Widholm hopes that Thurow’s donation will be a catalyst for other gifts.

“As we seek to expand the art historical canon for future generations to study, I hope people will think of us if they have work by significant, interesting artists with ties to Chicago. We would like to be the home for that work to create a meaningful platform for its study and display alongside great works of art from around the world.” she said.

 

image above: Candida Alvarez, “Son So & So,” Acrylic and Graphite, 2001.

Upcoming Events

Public Opening Reception for Winter Exhibitions

1/26/2017

JANUARY 26 | 6:00 – 8:00 PM 

Please join us for the opening reception of our three new exhibitions “Four Saints in Three Acts,” “The Many Faces of Vincent de Paul,” and “One day this kid will get larger” on Thursday, January 26 from 6-8pm. There will be a live performance by artist Darling Shear in the second floor galleries, as well as refreshments and a cash bar in the second floor event space.

Free and open to everyone

 

 

 

Read More >

Curator’s Tour and Screening

1/28/2017

JANUARY 28 | 2:00 PM 

Following guest-curator Danny Orendorff’s tour of the exhibition all of the film and video works included in “One day this kid will get larger” will be presented as a free-to-attend screening.

Free and open to everyone, but space is limited. Please register in advance. 

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Simone Zurawski Lecture: "Saint Vincent"

2/8/2017

FEBRUARY 8 | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM AT DEPAUL ART MUSEUM

 

DePaul History of Art and Architecture Professor Simone Zurawski will lead a talk about the current exhibition The Many Faces of Vincent de Paul: Nineteenth-Century French Romanticism and the Sacred.

FREE

 

RSVP

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